Heritage \ Writings \

William Goldie (1835-1926)
Owned Wilson Hoop Company in West Bay City, and a large farm in Hampton township.

Biography - Added June, 2010.

A Century and a Half of Pittsburg and Her People, Vol. 4, 1908

WILLIAM GOLDIE
_______

William Goldie, of Wilkinsburg, Greater Pittsburg, well known as an inventor of railway appliances, was born April 27, 1835, at Ayr, Scotland, a son of David Goldie and grandson of William Goldie, who never quitted his native “land of brown health and shaggy wood.” He was the father of the following children: Gilbert, William, John, James, Anna, Giles and David.

David Goldie, son of William Goldie, was born in 1810, at Ayr, and was a manufacturer of shoelasts. He is entitled to the distinction of having been the first to develop the mechanism for making these articles, which until that time were products of handwork. He had a large factory at Ayr and carried on a flourishing business. In 1844 he brought his family to the United States, being also accompanied by his brothers, Gilbert and John. Gilbert settled in Illinois and John found a home in Canada, where he became a prosperous flour merchant. David, after a short stay in New York, went to Montreal, Canada, where in 1846 he met his death by drowning. David Goldied married Jessie, daughter of James and Agnes (Bond) McCall, both natives of Scotland, and two children were born to them: Jennie, wife of Albert Early, and William, of whom later.

William Goldie, son of David and Jessie (McCall) Goldie, was a child at the time of his father's death, and after that event his widowed mother returned to Scotland with her two children. At the end of a year, however, she returned with them to Canada, where William received his education. On reaching the age of eighteen he came to the United States, settling at Fenton, Michigan, where he engaged in the stove business, a branch of industry with which he is today indirectly connected. Upon attaining his majority he elected to become a citizen of the United States, and thereupon took out his naturalization papers. Not long after he turned his attention to the invention of various railway appliances, especially those pertaining to road-beds and railway construction. He has taken out in all more than sixty patents, including some for woodworking and steelworking, and no fewer than twenty for railroad tieplates. During the last sixteen years he has devoted himself solely to the improvement of railway spikes and tieplates. Among the former is the well-known Goldie Patented Perfect Railroad Spike. In 1889 he went to Pittsburg for the purpose of introducing these inventions, many of which were purchased and used by the firm of Dilworth Porter & Company, Limited, of that city. Mr. Goldie derives a large income from royalties on his many patents.

While a resident of Michigan he made his home for the greater part of the time at Fenton, and during the remainder at Bay City. He is still interested in may enterprises in those places, being president of the Goldie Manufacturing Company of West Bay City, and of a flour company. He is also president of the New Kinsington Stone Company and the Iron City Stone & Concrete Company. For the past years he has resided in Wilkinsburg, and at one time held the office of school director of the borough. In politics he gives his aid and endorsement to the principles of the Republican party. He is an active member of the First Presbyterian church of Wilkinsburg, and for three years served on its board of trustees.

Mr. Goldie has been twice married. His first wife was Nancy Ann Malone, of Canada, by whom he had the following children: Jessie, wife of Henry W. Kennedy, children, Lucile, Florence, Ruth and Marion; Eva, wife of E. A. Porter, children, Edna, Florence and Brewerton; and William, married Mary Danskin, of Bay City, Michigan. On being left a widower Mr. Goldied married Emma, daughter of Willard Hall, of Fenton, Michigan. The only child of this marriage is a daughter named Elizabeth.

Goldie Hoop Factory - added April, 2014.

Michigan Manufacturer & Financial Record, Vol. 1, Iss. 18, March 5, 1910.

HOOP MILL STARTS UP.

Work in the stave department of the Goldie Hoop Factory, at Bay City, will commence next week. The factory is giving employment to over forty at the present time, and with the reopening of the stave department the force will be about doubled. The capacity of the plant has not increased, but the company is looking for a long run, as the demand for its output is greater this year than ever before, and the market is appreciably higher. The company has its own lumber camps in the north supplying it with rough material, and this season's run will last until late next fall.

Family history & genealogy. Added June, 2010.

A Family History Comprising the Surnames of Gade-Godie-Gaudie- Gawdie – 1919.

WILLIAM GOLDIE.
_______

Son of David and Jessie (McCall) Goldie, was born in Ayshire, Scotland, April 27, 1835, and came to Montreal, Canada, with is parents in 1844, where he learned the cooperage business. He married Nancy Malone of Ayr, Ontario, in 1862 and in 1864 removed with family to Fenton, Genesee Co., Mich., where he engaged in the stave and cooperage business. On Oct. 30, 1874, his wife by whom four children, died, and on Dec. 20, 1876, he married Emma Hall, also of Fenton, Mich.

During this time he had been very successful in his business affairs and had accumulated a good deal of property, but in the panic of 1879 much of this was swept away by the failure of New York firms with whom he dealt. In 1880 he removed to Bay City, Mich., where he engaged very extensively in the lumber business and in the purchase and sale of timber lands. In 1881 his factories were burned and he was so badly injured by a fall that he was incapacitated for business for six months, and lost all he had gained.

Being possessed with an inventive proclivity he determined to try and recuperate his finances by the application of this attribute; and took up the improvement of wood-working machines for cutting shingles, veneers and staves, and spent about three years in the development of machinery along these lines of invention, from which he received a fair compensation. About this time his attention was called to the need of a railroad spike that would not mutilate the fibre of soft wood tile which the railroads were then beginning to use. He experimented for about a year before he discovered one that was satisfactory, but that was only the first step, as it was six years before he developed a machine that would do the work well and cheaply enough to be a success commercially. When this was done he had to sell out a number of interests in the patents and organized a company for holding the patent, in which he retained the control. In 1889 these were leased to Dilworth Porter Company on royalty and the proceeds divided equitably to the stockholders. He also took out during this time a great number of patents on tie-plates for use on the railroad tracks, and the same firm manufactured these. These inventions proved very successful, the royalties paid by Dilworth Porter amounting to considerable over a million dollars. His patents all expired in 1914, and he has since had no connection with the steel business. He is now principal stockholder and president of the following corporations, viz.: -- The New Kensington Stone and Sand Company, Wilkinsburg cement building blocks and concrete specialties; The Piqua Flour Company, Piqua, Ohio, flour, grain and feed. After passing through the common vicissitudes of a business career Mr. Goldie finds the owner of valuable estates and abundant financial means. He has a fine stately residence at Wilkinsburg, Pa., and a beautiful summer seat at Martha's Vineyard Island. Notwithstanding his age (82 years) he is in splendid health and as actively engaged in business as ever. See portrait in this work. Children's names presently.

Jessie Goldie, eldest daughter of William and Nancy (Malone) Goldie, born in Fenton, Mich., Aug. 2, 1865; was married Dec. 31, 1889, to Henry W. Kennedy at Bay City, Mich., where they now reside. Mr. Kennedy is interested in the manufacture of railroad supplies. They have four daughters names as follows:

    Lucille Kennedy, born Feb. 25, 1891 at Plainwell, Mich., was married to Claud Buyyard at Bay City, Mich., Oct. 19, 1914. Mr. Buyyard is in the office of the President of the Pere Marquette Railroad and located at Detroit, Mich. They have one daughter, -- Margaret-Elizabeth, born March 14, 1917.

    Florence Kennedy, born in Plainwell, Mich., June 28, 1892; was married May 9, 1916, to Frank B. Yourison of Wilkinsburg, Pa., at Bay City. Mr. Yourison is interested with his father in the manufacture of dry paints at Pittsburg, Pa. They have one daughter, -- Ruth-Eleanor, born June 5, 1917.

    Ruth Kennedy, born in Shipshewana, Ind., Feb. 14, 1894, is living at home in Bay City, Mich.

Mary Goldie, second daughter of William and Nancy Malone Goldie, born Nov. 4, 1868, was married June 4, 1907, to James J. McAffee of Pittsburg, Pa. He is engaged in the practice of law in Wilkinsburg, Pa. One child, Mary Goldie McAffee, born Jan. 17, 1909; died Jan. 30, 1909.

Eva Goldie, third daughter of William and Nancy (Malone) Goldie, born Aug. 25, 1872; was married June 5, 1894 at Wilkinsburg, Pa., to Edward Arthur Potter, by whom there were five children as follows:

    William Goldie Potter, born Nov., 1894 at Pittsburg, Pa.

    Edna-Elizabeth Potter, born Feb. 13, 1896.

    Arthur-Benerton Potter, born Feb. 12, 1898.

    Florence-May Potter, born Feb. 27, 1900.

    Howard Potter, born Aug. 30, 1907. All reside at 209 Trenton Ave., Wilkinsburg, Pa.

William Goldie, son of William and Nancy (Malone) Goldie, born Oct. 21, 1874; married at Bay City, Mich., in Oct., 1902, to Mary Danskin, where he is interested in the manufacture of Goldie Railroad specialties.

Bessie Goldie, daughter of William and Emma (Hall) Goldie, born July 11, 1879; was married April 18, 1910, to Anboris R. Guimaraea of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. One child, Mary Elizabeth, born Aug. 7, 1911, resides with her parents and grandparents at 106 Trenton Ave., Wilkinburg, Pa.

Additional Notes.

    1870 - Census: Michigan.
    Goldie, William - b. 1834/35, Scotland.
    Nancy, wife - b. 1840/41, Ireland.
    Jessie, son - b. 1865/66, Mich.
    Mary, daughter - b. 1868/69, Mich.

    1926 - William Goldie died 1926, and is buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in Pittsburgh, where his wife Emma (1849-1921) is also buried.

    The Goldie Manufacturing Co., was formerly known as the Wilson Hoop Company, which was owned by Fitzland L. Wilson who established the plant in 1882.



Related Pages/Notes

Related Pages:
Wilson Hoop Co.
Indian Relics
People Referenced

Bond, Agnes (m-inlaw)
Buyyard, Claud
Danskin, Mary
Early, Albert
Goldie, Anna (aunt)
Goldie, Bessie (dau)
Goldie, David (father)
Goldie, David (uncle)
Goldie, Elizabeth (dau)
Goldie, Eva (dau)
Goldie, Gilbert (uncle)
Goldie, Giles (uncle)
Goldie, James (uncle)
Goldie, Jennie (sis)
Goldie, Jessie (dau)
Goldie, John (uncle)
Goldie, Mary (dau)
Goldie, William (uncle)
Goldie, William Sr. (g-father)
Goldie, William (subject)
Goldie, William Jr. (son)
Guimaraea, Anboris R.
Guimaraea, Mary E. (g-dau)
Hall, Emma (2-wife)
Kennedy, Florence (g-dau)
Kennedy, Henry W.
Kennedy, Lucille (g-dau)
Kennedy, Magaret E. (g-dau)
Kennedy, Ruth (g-dau)
Kennedy, Ruth E. (gg-dau)
Malone, Nancy C. (1-wife)
McAffee, James J.
McAffee, Mary G. (g-dau)
McCall, James (f-inlaw)
McCall, Jessie (mother)
Porter, Brewerton (g-son)
Porter, E.A.
Porter, Edna (g-dau)
Porter, Florence (g-dau)
Potter, Arthur B. (g-son)
Potter, Edna E. (g-dau)
Potter, Edward A.
Potter, Florence (g-dau)
Potter, Howard (g-son)
Potter, William G. (g-son)
Wilson, Fitzland L.
Yourison, Frank B.
Subjects Referenced
Ayshire, Scotland
Bay City, MI
Bay Co., MI
Detroit, MI
Dilworth Porter & Co.
Fenton, MI
Goldie Mfg. Co.
Illinois
Iron City Stone Co.
Martha's Vineyard Island
Montreal, Canada
New Kinsington Stone Co.
Pere Marquette RR
Piqua, OH
Piqua Flour Co.
Pittsburg, PA
Presbyterian Church
Shishewana, IN
West Bay City, MI
Wilkinsburg, PA
Wilson Hoop Co.
Woodland Cemetery
WRITINGS: History As It Was Written Then.