Heritage \ Writings \ Industry: Printing & Publishing

News Brevities - October 31, 1863.
Published by the Bay City Press and Times.
William A. Bryce, Editor
  • Transcribed (March 2007)
  • Bay City Press and Times - October 31, 1863 (page 2)

    NEWS BREVITIES.
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    Lumbering operations - in the Saginaw Valley during the comming winter, promise to be largely increased over those of any former year. The very high prices of lumber the past season have caused a complete clearing out of everything saleable in that line in the valley. Large preparations are making for the winter campaign against the army of pines lying along the banks of the various tributaries of the Saginaw. Numerous camps are being established, far beyond the confines of civilization, and large numbers of lumbermen will soon take on their winter quarters in them. Immense quantities of supplies and forage are now being transported to the front, which ere long will be the scene of the most active operations.

    We are glad to note these indications of business and success. The dense pineries which will be the scene of operations we have referred to, lie all around Bay City -- East, West and South; and every foot of the lumber cut this winter, except such as may be used in the valley, must pass by our very doors to find its way to a market. Much of it will be manufactured in the mills in this city and vicinity, which will make money easy and trade brisk next summer.

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    The Telegraph. – The Western Union Telegraph line is now completed and in operation to this city. The Office is at T. E. Doughty’s Book Store; A. Ferguson is the operator. – E. Saginaw Enterprise Oct. 22d.

    The proper terminus of that line is at Bay City, and shame will, as it should, rest upon our business men until they cultivate sufficient public spirit to see to it that the line is extended to their town. Once put in operation, it would doubtless pay expenses and interest on its costs, and ultimately prove a good pecuniary investment, while it must be apparent to all that it would result in a general benefit which can in no other way be attained. Shall we have a telegraph, or shall we be content to remain always “a day too late.”

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    New Buildings. – If anything were needed to illustrate the business activity of our city, it might be found in the fact that twenty-one new buildings have been erected on the “burnt district” along, since the great fire in July last. Nearly all of these are stores or shops, among them a fine brick store, which has just been completed by Mr. H. Cooper. But the number above stated is not more than one-eighth of the whole number of buildings erected here during the past summer; and still the demand for room is no nearer supplied than it was last spring. It will be seen, therefore, that the population of Bay City must have largely increase this year; and not a day passes that does not add to its number. It has more than doubled within the past four years. At this rate of increase, how long will it be before Bay City will attain the status of a full grown city? It is the port of the richest Valley in the Union.

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    Changes of Names. – The Sherman House has recently been so remodeled as to make its change of name to that of “Boutell House” quite appropriate. It has been so thoroughly renovated and repaired that it may be considered a new house. Extensive additions have been made to it, which increase its capacity for the accommodation of guests more than double. We cheerfully recommend the Boutell House to the traveling public, as worth of their patronage.

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    The machinery – has been taken out of Watson’s Stave Factory, and the building is to be moved up to the line of Water street, adjoining the Bay City Mills, where it will be fitted up for the accommodation of two stores. We understand that two brick stores are soon to be erected on the ground now occupied by the stave mill. It is with pleasure we note these propose improvements. The appearance of Water street will be much improved by them.

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    Mr. T. R. Gahan, – who was burned out in the July fire, has just opened a new stock of Groceries in his new store, on Water street, one block about the site of his old stand.

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    Have you Heard from the Draft! – For two or three days past the city has been filled with rumors relative to the draft. Nothing, however, of a definite character has been received up to the present writing. The suspense will undoubtedly be relieved within the next forty-eight hours, before the expiration of which time full returns will probably be received.

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    The new sidewalks – laid down on Saginaw and Fourth Streets, by Commissioner Goodwin, under direction of the Common Council, will prove a great blessing to the families whose residences are on those streets and will no doubt receive their hearty appreciation. We believe there is not another town in the State where so much side-walk has been built within the last five years as in Bay City.

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    The walls of the new brick block – now in progress of erection on Water Street, by Mr. Jas. Fraser, are nearly completed. The work is to be prosecuted with all possible dispatch, under the direction of that excellent architect, Mr. George Campbell.

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    W. D. Thayer advertises – 40,000 brick for sale, at his brick yard on the plank road, nine miles from this city.

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    When it became apparent that a draft – was going to be ordered in Michigan, the Governor and Adjutant General repaired to Washington to see that the State was credited with all the troops she had put in the field. They found the State credited at the War Office with only 4,500 men. They at once proceeded to collect their proofs, furnished copies of muster rolls, which had been mislaid or overlooked, as they were enable to do by the admirable management of the chief military office in this State, and secured us a credit of 5,000 men, in addition to the above, thus diminishing the draft over one-half.

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    Out in the Cold. – The Flint and Pere Marquette Railway is a money making institution. We judge that the gains are the result of the extraordinary amount of travel to and from the Saginaw Valley, rather than any parsimony, economy, or whatever it may be called. We are at a loss, therefore to discover why the waiting rooms at the Flint Station, are not warmed in such a manner as to secure the comfort of passengers who are compelled to wait sometimes half an hour after the arrival of the omnibuses from the hotel before the cars leave for Saginaw. Surely Superintendent Potter, who is a model business man, is not aware of this delinquency. Lady passengers, however, have been made painfully sensible of it.

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    The Saginaw Courier – announces the death on the 15th inst of Elijah N. Davenport, a well known and esteemed citizen of Saginaw county, and one of the pioneers of the valley. He was 63 years of age. Mr. Davenport, had resided in Saginaw county since 1835, and during the time held many public positions, and was at one time the Associate Judge of the Circuit Court. He was also a respected member of the Masonic fraternity.

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    New Stand. – Mssrs. Mather and Colburn have recently erected a new store on Water street, opposite Bloedon’s furnishing ware-rooms, to which they have removed their stock of fruits and vegetables.

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    COMMON COUNCIL. Recorder’s Office, Bay City, October, 23, 1863. - Regular meeting of the Common Council of the village of Bay City held as above. Present, Councilmen Catlin, Bradley, Hart, the President and Recorder.

    On motion, the time for the collection of taxes for the year 1863, was further extended to the 15th day of November next ensuing, and the Treasurer allowed until the 15th day of December, 1863, to make his return to the recorder of all taxes remaining unpaid.

    On motion, the Recorder was instructed to correspond with Messrs. Hayden & Baldwin of Detroit in relation to purchasing hose. Also to make the necessary alteration and repairs in the building leased for engines, Adjourned.

    - N. WHITTEMORE, Recorder.

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    CHURCH DIRECTORY - Each Sabath there will be preaching at the Methodist Church, on Washington Avenue, Bay City, by Rev. H. O. Park, Pastor, at 10-1/2 o’clock, A.M., AND 7-1/2 o’clock P.M. Prayer meeting on Thursday evening of each week at 7-1/2 o’clock.

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    LIST OF LETTERS - Remaining uncalled for in the Postoffice at Bay City, Oct., 31, 1863. Persons calling for any of the following letters will please say they are advertised. Jane Brush – C.E.J. Brooks – John Cochrane – Philip Gregor – Ezekiel Fields – Horatio Leinback – John Montrose – George McKeene – Noach Notrip – John North – Andrew Richmond – E. M. Wheaton

    H. S. RAYMOND, P.M.

    Relate Notes & Pages

    William A. Bryce...
    founded this newspaper in 1859, which he carried on until 1864, when he enlished in the 29th Mich. Inf., where he was quartermaster. Bryce was the first grandmaster of the Masonic Lodge in Bay City. His paper was located on the corner of Fourth and Saginaw streets.
    Related Pages:
    First Edition
    Civil War News 1863-64
    People Referenced
    Bloedon,
    Boutell,
    Bradley,
    Brooks, C.E.J.
    Brush, Jane
    Campbell, George
    Catlin,
    Cochrane, John
    Colburn,
    Cooper, H.
    Davenport, Elijah N.
    Doughty, T.E.
    Ferguson, A.
    Fields, Ezekiel
    Fraser, Jas.
    Gregor, Philip
    Hart,
    Gahan, T.R.
    Goodwin,
    Leinback, Horatio
    Mather,
    McKeene, George
    Montrose, John
    North, John
    Notrip, Noach
    Park, H.O. Rev.
    Richmond, Andrew
    Sherman,
    Thayer, W.D.
    Wheaton, E.M.
    Whittemore, N.
    Subjects Referenced
    Bay City, MI
    Bay City Mills
    Boutell House
    Common Council
    Draft (Civil War)
    E. Saginaw Enterprise
    Flint R.R. station
    Fire July, 1862
    Hayden & Balwins Detroit
    Lumbering
    Methodist Church
    MI Adjutant General
    MI Governor
    Pere Marquette R.R.
    Plank road
    Postoffice
    Saginaw, MI
    Saginaw Co., MI
    Saginaw Courier
    Saginaw Valley
    Sherman House
    War Office (Washington)
    Watson's Stave Factory
    Western Union Telegraph
    Advertisements on Page
    DON'T FAIL TO GO!
    WILDS & KENSIE'S
    Minstrels,
    at the Birney Hall,
    On Wednesday and Thursday Eveneings, Novbermber 4th and 5th.
    Doors open at 1-1/2 o'clock -- Concert to commence at 8 o'clock. Admission 25 cents.
    W.H. MUNSHAW, aGENT.
    WANTED.
    Furs and Deer Skins!
    Hart & Monroe,

    will pay the highest market price for
    SILVER FOX, OTTER, FISHER, BEAR, Martin, Wolfe, Cross Fox, Red Fox, Grey Fox, Beaver, Badger, Lynx, Mink, Wild Cat, raccoon, Muskrat, Skunk & Deer.
    Stave Mill for Sale,
    Or a practical partner in stave manufacturing, with a cash captial of 85,000 would be preferred. Inquire
    JAMES WATSON.
    WRITINGS: History As It Was Written Then.